“My Easter Message” by Darius M. Ratcliff

HAPPYEASTER

“Buona Pasqua”

(Italian – Happy Easter)

MY EASTER MESSAGE

Do you seek eternal laughter,

And no tears to follow after;

You can find by Christ receiving,

Once for all on Him believing.

If the Christ you are refusing,

If His word you’re not perusing:

Am I right, or merely guessing,

You’ll be missing heaven’s blessing.

Why then wait till comes disaster?

Years are passing fast and faster:

Now’s the day for you to hearken,

Lest the night forever darken.

If the world your heart is filling,

And to change you’re all unwilling:

Do you know what you’ll be reaping?

Must your journey end in weeping?

Perhaps you dread a life of giving,

Ever for some others living:

Surely it is worth the trying;

On the Lord’s own word relying.

There is joy in Christian giving,

And for others always living:

You’ll be glad when you surrender,

And to Christ your service render.

Others are the world reminding,

What they want in Christ they’re finding:

In this life of thrill and action,

They are finding satisfaction.

When the shades of night are fallen,

And our lives are past recalling,

Are you sure that you’ll be voicing

Songs of heaven’s glad rejoicing?

You today may this be knowing

And like Jesus, too be growing

If you come to Jesus merely,

And accept Him now sincerely.

Image above retrieved from:

http://digitalgallery.nypl.org/nypldigital/dgkeysearchdetail.cfm?trg=1&strucID=1065603&imageID=1587578&total=18&num=0&word=jesus%20christ%20resurrection&s=1&notword=&d=&c=&f=&k=1&lWord=&lField=&sScope=&sLevel=&sLabel=&sort=&imgs=20&pos=14&e=w

Image Details

Image Title:  Buona Pasqua. Item Physical Description: 1 postcard : col., embossed ; 14 x 9 cm.

 Notes: Gold metallic accents. Source: Holiday postcards / Easter — Foreign. Source Description: 16 postcards : col. ; 9 x 14 cm. Location: Mid-Manhattan Library / Picture Collection. Catalog Call Number: PC POC Easter – Foreign. Digital ID: 1587578. Record ID: 1065603. Digital Item Published: 9-10-2007; updated 5-15-2012.

“Miss Vermilye” by Darius M. Ratcliff, January 29, 1943

Interior, First Baptist Church, Naples, New York, 1912, Rev. S.T. Harding in Pulpit.

Photo above: A special thank you to Donald Gelder of Naples, New York for sharing this photo of the interior of  First Baptist Church, Naples, New York.

Excerpt from the Article: “The Observer Observes”

The Baptist folk here are a good people. Their numbers are small but they are a brave little band. Without a pastor for nearly a year, they hung together, keeping their pulpit supplied nearly every Sunday, gave a concert at Memorial Hall, had church teas etc. They kept their lamps always trimmed and burning. I thought of all these things when at Union service last week Sunday night. They have a pretty little church, neatly furnished, lighted and decorated. The pulpit furniture given by Miss Katherine M. Vermilye and her sister, in sacred memory, will be a lasting monument.

Source: Newspaper: Naples, New York,  THE NAPLES NEWS, Wednesday Afternoon, May 20, 1914, Volumes XVI,  No. 23

MISS VERMILYE

Your years now number eighty eight,

With us you’ve tarried very late.

The added years have been our treasure,

To us they’ve brought both help and pleasure.

We hope they’re not o’er burdened you,

That you have found them pleasant too.

I shall not wish you many more,

But only those God has in store.

We ask you not to haste away,

We’d like to have you longer stay.

But when you’re tired and want to go,

May God see fit to grant is so.

But while your stay is with us still,

May God your stay with blessings fill.

And may you add a few more treasures,

To thus increase your future pleasures.

And may the Christ walk by your side,

Till you with Him above abide.

IN MEMORY OR THEIR MOTHER

Sunday, September 8th was the fourth anniversary of Rev. S. T. Harding‘s pastoral work in the Baptist church of Naples and the services were suitable to the occasion. The subject of the morning being looking backward and the evening a forward look, mention was made of all the improvements realized and those that are still hoped for. It was also the occasion of using the first time of the new pulpit furnishing presented to the church by Mrs. S. C. Semans and Miss Katherine Vermilye in memory of their mother, Mrs. Belinda Vermilye, who was for many years a beloved member of the church. The gift consists of a pulpit desk and five handsome chairs which are in harmony with the new decorations of the church and a great addition.

Source: Newspaper, Naples, New York, THE NAPLES NEWS, Wednesday Afternoon, September 11, 1912, Volume XIV, Number 40

MRS. BELINDA VERMILYE

Monday night, May 8th at the home on Elizabeth St., and after a day of considerable activity on her part, Mrs. Vermilye entered into her rest.

Though having been for several months seriously ill, with the end not unexpected at any time, yet she had recovered somewhat and was again getting about, so that her death came suddenly and while she was in possession of considerable physical and much mental strength. She had reached the age of 86 years, 8 months and 22 days and had until her sickness remarkable vigor. These years were all crowned with usefulness and honor.

Mrs. Vermilye was born in Prattsburg August 16, 1818, the daughter of John and Hannah Phelps. A brother, Rev. James Phelps, now dead often visited her here. The sister, Mrs. Emily Van Vleet Ward, once a resident of Naples lives at Coopers Plains. Her marriage to John Vermilye was in 1844 and in 1867 the family moved to Naples.

Mr. Vermilye was not strong and died 36 years ago. In December 1898 James the only son died. The additional burdens of life thus imposed on the widow were assumed with fortitude and ability, marked elements in her character. They were shared also by her two daughters Mrs. Stephen C. Semans and Miss Katharine, who survive her, also a beloved daughter-in-law, Mrs. James Vermilye and her four sons, Louis, John, George and James all of Naples.

Mrs. Vermilye was a woman of very decided character and marked personality. She possessed strong insight, decided views, together with a bright and cheerful temperament. She was fond of the society of the young, sympathized  with them in their plans and made herself so congenial to them that they sought her presence and delighted in her company. Her church was very dear to her and had been from her youth, the object of her solicitude and care, and when in health her place was never vacant. She was indeed a loved and honored mother in Israel. Her interest in the Sabbath services during her recent illness never faltered, always desiring to know the subject of discourse, and the text was always found for her. She was often found by the bedside of the sick or dying as a most loving and sympathizing friend.

During the years of her widowhood she had been most lovingly cared for by her children and grandchildren and the mutual devotion was very apparent. Her exemplary life as a Christian, as a mother, neighbor and friend could not be surpassed. Let us not mourn as those without hope, that the active hands are folded now, or that the loving eyes are closed and the fond heart stilled,but let us rather look beyond, where eternal youth is hers, where her eyes are opened to scenes of ineffable glory, faith to sight and prayer to praise.

The funeral will be held at the Baptist church tomorrow afternoon at 2 o’clock, her pastor Rev. H. L. Howard to officiate. Interment will be in Rose Ridge beside her husband and son.

Source: Newspaper, Naples, New York, THE NAPLES NEWS, Wednesday, May 10, 1905, Volume VII, Number 22

KATHERINE M. VERMILYE

Miss Katherine M. Vermilye, 91, of Naples, died on Monday, March 12, 1945, at the Clark Manor House, in Canandaigua, where she made her home since December 4, 1928.

Miss Vermilye was a teacher in Naples schools for thirty-eight years, and her many former pupils still praise her as an instructor of exceptional ability. Her good influence will continue to be an active force as long as any of her pupils survive.

Miss Vermilye was born in Prattsburgh, on January 29, 1854, a daughter of John and Maria Belinda Phelps Vermilye. She did not attend school until she was thirteen years old, at which age she came to Naples with her parents, having received instruction at home up to that time. She first attended school in the old schoolhouse on the “Commons” in North Main Street, Naples. In 1873, she was graduated from the old Naples Academy. After teaching in district schools in this vicinity for a few terms, at $3.00 a week, she was engaged to teach seventh and eighth grades in the Naples Union Free School, in 1880, under the principalship of Percy I. Bugbee. From that time until her retirement in June, 1914, her principal work was with the eighth grade.

Miss Vermilye was a member of the Naples Baptist Church and of its auxiliaries, and was active in church work until she went to reside in Canandaigua.

She is survived by three nephews, John S. Vermilye, of Naples, George Vermilye of Pennsylvania, and James H. Vermilye of Naples; three grand-nephews, Charles Vermilye of Penn Yan, Edward Vermilye of Baltimore, Md., and Rodney W. Vermilye, of Petersburg, Va.; two grand-nieces, Mrs. Earl H. Norton, of Greenwich, N.Y., and Miss Pauline Vermilye, of Rochester.

Services will be held from the Kennedy undertaking rooms in Canandaigua at 2:00 p.m. on Wednesday, conducted by Charles Wallis, pastor of the Canandaigua Baptist Church. Interment will be made in the Rose Ridge cemetery, in Naples, at a later date.

Source: Newspaper, Naples, New York, THE NAPLES RECORD, Wednesday, March 14, 1945,Volume 77, Number 11

 

 

“Marjory Dear”, “To Rosemary”, and “Shirley” by Darius M. Ratcliff

Girl on Her Way to Church by George Hitchcock (1850 – 1913)


MARJORY DEAR

Here’s a word for Marjory dear:

Summer days will soon be here;

School ‘ll be left to memories dread

Joyous times’ll then appear.

When you’re through with Sunday’s preaching

And your teacher  has done with teaching,

Let the care come out a screetching,

Make it hum till here you’re reaching.

First we’ll start right in to talk,

Then we’ll take a pleasant walk,

Keep it up till ladies balk,

Act as mad as any hawk.

You must plan to stay till night:

That’s the time that skeeters bite,

Cat’s come out and start to fight,

Give the girls an awful fright.

Cats will come a catawauling,

Start the babies all a squalling:

Bugs and worms will come a crawling;

Girls and boys will then be bawling.

Then the night air you’ll be feeling,

Hear the pigies all a squeling:

You’ll be someraults a keeling

Till little head and heels are reeling.

Won’t we have alot of fun.

Get all blackened in the sun,

Scare the cows and make them run.

All get sick, every one.

Won’t we have a lot of funning,

For the day with us is doneing?

Eyes pop out and start to running,

Heads jump off and start to spunning.

Girls like you to Christ are dear,

He would have you ever near.

You should Sunday school attend,

And from church too, never wend.

You should give to Christ your heart,

Of His church become a part.

You should ask Him to take you,

Keep you His your journey through.

You should come to Him in prayer

Let Him meet you often there.

You His word should daily read,

And to what it says give heed.

You should do for Him some work

Never let yourself this shirk.

You should love Him more and more

Till your earthly life is o’ver.

TO ROSEMARY

I’ve not forgotten Rosemary,

Nor lost her pleasant smile

She was a little fairy,

And did my heart beguile.

I send my love to Rosemary,

The little southern maid:

Sweet words take wings and carry,

Nor let your message fade.

Tell her the love of Jesus

Can human hearts adorn;

From ugliness it frees us,

When in our bosoms worn.

Tell her the love of Jesus

Is free from all alloy:

That it from sorrow frees us;

Is freighted rich with joy.

SHIRLEY

(Written for a family who had just lost their baby.)

And have you come and gone so soon?

And have you left us desolate?

We dreamed your life you’d share with us,

But such was not to be your fate.

We will not say that all was vain,

That we have hoped and loved for nought:

Perhaps we do not understand,

Perhaps God’s hand through you has wrought.

Some live for years and some for days,

But all at last will pass away.

Who knows what mansions are above?

And whom God needs in heaven’s day?

Our little one we bid adieu:

Our hearts with heaven now have a tie:

We’ll think of you close to our God,

We’ll plan to meet you by and by.

Public Domain Image above retrieved from:
http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Brooklyn_Museum_-_Girl_on_Her_Way_to_Church_-_George_Hitchcock_-_overall.jpg

“Now I Dream of Heaven” by Darius M. Ratcliff

Soul Carried to Heaven by William-Adolphe Bouguereau (1825 – 1905)

NOW I DREAM OF HEAVEN

 

And now I dream of heaven,

Of heaven bright and fair:

I know it won’t be long

Before my welcome there.

I’m old I know, past eighty,

My friends have gone before;

I’ll not be sad nor lonely

Upon the glory shore.

Through life my God has been

So very good to me;

To Him I must be grateful,

As grateful as can be.

My Bible tells how all

Are lost in sin and woe;

Yet how in Christ we can

Be saved while here below.

I’ve cast myself on Him,

A sinner at His feet;

I trust His grace to give me

Salvation full complete.

As he on earth did suffer

On cross atonement make

I shall now live forever

Accepted for his sake.

I’m very near the river

Near my eternal home,

Where I shall joy forever

Before my Savior’s throne.

Image above retrieved from:

Source: http://www.oceansbridge.com/oil-paintings/product/55530/soulcarriedtoheaven